BLUE Ocean Education and Schools

canturbury schools
The week was filled with many exciting events for the entire school community!
  • MONDAY: Students in grades 9-12 hosted journalist and author of 50 Ways to Save the Ocean, David Helvarg.  
  • TUESDAY: Students in PK3 – Grade 4 celebrated with a very special guest speaker, Michael Fishbach, and his wife Ms. Heather Watrous, co-founders of the Whale Conservancy. Mr. Fischbach has given a TED talk and has spoken to students of all ages about his conservation efforts with whales. Students also participated in marine mammal-themed art stations with Lower School Art Teacher Mrs. Moorefield, learned about humpback whales at reading stations in the library with Mrs. Garrison, and did a hands-on science station with Ms. Watrous. They also viewed award-winning kids BLUE ocean films in the makerspace.
  • WEDNESDAY: Upper school students worked with scientists from the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration with the Message in a Buoy / Adopt a Drifter Program The Florida Institute of Oceanography R/V Weatherbird II, a 115-foot, 194-ton vessel. Students will be tracking an ocean drifter with GPS tracker for up to a year to help scientists study ocean circulation and sea surface temperature changes.
  • THURSDAY: Since BLUE is dedicated to PROMOTING, HONORING, and SHARING great ocean films, middle and upper school students celebrated the opening of the film festival by attending a film block with question and answer session with filmmakers at the Palladium. The students loved the opportunity to see these award winning films!
  • SATURDAY: We had over 20 students and parents help with the Blue Ocean coastal cleanup.  We recovered more than 25 bags of trash from the coastal area of Clam Bayou!
VR Activities at BLUE

VR Workshops

Students enjoyed a hands-on look at VR technologies in our VR workshops.  

Hands On Science

Students with scientists from the NOAA with the Message in a Buoy / Adopt a Drifter Program

Beach Clean Up

We had over 20 students and parents help with the Blue Ocean coastal cleanup

Message in a Buoy program at BLUE with NOAA

Our partners at the Global Drifter Program have updated their Adopt a Drifter website with an exciting new announcement!   Our most recent Drifter deployment:

Bancroft Arnesen Explore & Roald Amundsen High School Drifter Bancroft Arnesen Explore & Roald Amundsen High School[/caption]

Please check the new site out when you get a chance (www.adp.noaa.gov).  Second, I wanted to send you the link to the data for one of the drifters that was launched.    Do feel free to track the drifter #4201504 on the AOML page http://www.aoml.noaa.gov/phod/dac/gdp_track.php 

The modern drifter is a high-tech version of the “message in a bottle”. It consists of a surface buoy and a subsurface drogue (sea anchor), attached by a long, thin tether. The buoy measures temperature and other properties, and has a transmitter to send the data to passing satellites. The drogue dominates the total area of the instrument and is centered at a depth of 15 meters beneath the sea surface.

More Information and Drifter Images >>

Determine if you have found a drifter, as opposed to some other floating device.
The spherical float is 30-40 cm in diameter, is always made of plastic or fiberglass, and will have an identification number on it (usually five digits). The color of the float is not standardized: it could be bicolor, like the drifters shown on the top of this page, or it could be solid black or blue. It may have a tube on the top which houses the barometer, or it may be spherical. It may have two metal screws on the top hemisphere. It will always have a metal instrument (the thermistor) extruding near the bottom (you can see this on the white-and-red drifter in the top left picture on this page, surrounded by a small cardboard ring that falls off after deployment). At the very bottom of the float there is a rubberized “carrot” that connects the tether . . . or there will be evidence that this was once there, but has been broken or cut. Often, the subsurface drogue (sea anchor) will be gone from a drifter that has washed ashore; this may still be attached to a drifter recovered from the ocean. Drifters that have been floating for some time accumulate biofouling and may not look as clean as they looked when they first were deployed. This is a picture of a drifter that was on the water for 521 days and was recovered.

More Information and Drifter Images >>

Here is a list of things to do if you have found a drifter and you have it in your possession:

  • Look for any identification(usually a 5 digit number), or instructions on the surface of the float.
  • Take a picture of the drifter and all its components.
  • Contact Drifter Webmaster and send a picture and as much information as you can.
  • You can find deployment information about any drifter in our web page: Deployment_log

Learn about the History of Drifters Here

NOAA Adopt a Drifter Program

GREG MACGILLIVRAY | 2016 BLUE LEGACY AWARD

GREG MACGILLIVRAY | 2016 BLUE LEGACY AWARD

MacGillivray was first nominated for an Academy Award in 1995 for directing The Living Sea (Best Documentary Short Subject), and was nominated in the same category again for Dolphins in 2000.

He initiated the development of three cameras for the IMAX format the high-speed (slow-motion) camera, the industry’s first lightweight camera, and the “all-weather” camera used during filming on Mount Everest.

 

 

 

mfreeman

BLUE Ocean Film Awards 2016

BLUE Ocean Film Festival 2016 Awards and Honors

NAINOA THOMPSON | 2016 BLUE LEGACY AWARD

Renowned navigator and Polynesian Voyaging Society president Nainoa Thompson was honored at BLUE Ocean Film Festival with the 2016 Legacy Award at the annual BLUE Ocean Film Festival and Conservation Summit. The prestigious accolade celebrates and recognizes leaders that have made extraordinary achievements to create a lasting legacy in ocean conservation, exploration, education, innovation, and the pursuit of marine knowledge. Thompson was acknowledged for his leadership on the Malama Honua Worldwide Voyage as captain and navigator of iconic sailing canoe Hokulea. Throughout the world-spanning wayfinding journey, he has guided crew members in successfully sharing experiential education and inspiring communities to care for themselves, each other, and their natural and cultural environments. In addition to Thompson, the honor was also presented to Academy Award-nominated filmmaker Greg MacGillivray, who has produced and directed some of the industry’s most enduring conservation education films. Nainoa Thompson – native Hawaiian navigator of Hawaii’s traditional double-hull sailing canoe Hokule’a, and President of the Polynesian Voyaging Society – is a living conduit of Hawaiian culture and traditional wayfinding skills. He is the first Hawaiian to practice the art of wayfinding on long distance ocean voyages since voyaging ended in Hawai’i around the 14th century. Thompson has been a member of every major voyage of Hokule’a since she first set sail in 1976, including the 1978 voyage with big wave rider Eddie Aikau. pvs-logo-rgb

GREG MACGILLIVRAY | 2016 BLUE LEGACY AWARD

MacGillivray was first nominated for an Academy Award in 1995 for directing The Living Sea (Best Documentary Short Subject), and was nominated in the same category again forDolphins in 2000.

He initiated the development of three cameras for the IMAX format the high-speed (slow-motion) camera, the industry’s first lightweight camera, and the “all-weather” camera used during filming on Mount Everest.

mfreeman

DAVID EVANS SHAW | 2016 Making Waves Award

David Shaw Making Waves Award Winner BLUE 2016

David Evans Shaw is managing partner of Black Point Group LP, with wide-ranging interests in technology companies and public service. His business creation, leadership, investment and board experience includes numerous science-based companies including IDEXX Laboratories, Ikaria, Curiosity Stream, Ironwood, Physion, Vets First Choice, Modern Meadow, and others. Shaw’s public service experience includes AAAS, the National Park Foundation, the Jackson Laboratory, the Sargasso Sea Alliance, State of Maine, Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government, Maine Medical Center, Hurricane Island Outward Bound, the US-Israel Science and Technology Commission, the Council on Foreign Relations, Service Nation and others. He is a lifelong beneficiary of experiences in marine and terrestrial parks around the world.

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Use #BLUE2016 During BLUE 2016 for Social Impact!

Our official hashtag for the BLUE Ocean Film Festival event this year is #BLUE2016. You should tag all of your social media postings during and after the event with this tag so your content will be easily grouped with other attendees shared posts and to create a greater impact for the oceans.

blue2016hashtag

You might like to bookmark this special Twitter Hub that we have created in order to aggregate all of the media tagged #BLUE2016 so that we can share your posts after the festival and during the event.  You can even send new tweets to or about us (@BlueOceanFilm) right from that page.

Twitter Hub for #BLUE2016

You can even embed the hashtag hub into your own site, if you like. Just grab the code from the page. This is the live version of the embed.
EXAMPLE: Click the link to tell your followers that you are going to BLUE 2016